RAE, John

Male 1831 -


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  • Name RAE, John 
    Born 27 Oct 1831  Knocken, Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Occupation 1851 
    Teacher of English 
    Residence 1851  203 Thistle Street, The Gorbals, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    as a visitor 
    Occupation 1861 
    Teacher of English 
    Residence 1861  95 Belgrove Street, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation 1871  [1
    Superintendent (Reformational Institution) 
    Residence 1871  Kibble Reformatory Institution, Greenock Road, Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    • http://www.kibble.org/history.php
      He and his wife did a straight swap with the existing Head Teacher and Matron of Kibble Reform school in August 1867. They had previously worked at the Boy's House of Refuge in Duke Street, Glasgow. There were 43 other applicants for the post.
    Occupation 1891 
    Ironmonger 
    Residence 1891  6 Ibrox Place, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation 1901  Ironmonger Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1901  7 Kirkwood Street, Govan, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Kibble History - Summary of General Information

      Establishment of Kibble
      Opened in 1859 as Miss Kibble's Reformatory School, following a bequest from Miss Elizabeth Kibble (died 1841) to 'found and endow, in Paisley, an Institution for the purpose of reclaiming youthful offenders against the law'.

      In her will signed 7 August 1840 and registered at Edinburgh on 28 January 1841 she divides her wealth into two halves - one for legacies to her relatives and certain good causes, and the other for the establishment of the Kibble Reformatory. She comments on that and on her gifts to the various good causes that it was "...also to fulfil the intentions of the late Janet Kibble, my sister".

      Elizabeth Kibble's family was one of the prosperous and important families in Paisley at the time, inheriting land from both grandparents and acquiring other properties. They intermarried with other entrepreneurial families and her brother was one of the principal linen manufacturers in the town. He married a granddaughter of Humphrey Fulton of Maxwelltown who had introduced silk weaving into Paisley. Her mother's family was socially concerned, establishing the Thread Street School funded by the Corse legacy and, with her sister who had pre-deceased her, she had obviously thought about ways of improving life for the poor in Paisley either through existing institutions or through the establishing of a new one - Kibble Reformatory. She carefully shared her wealth among her brothers, brothers-in-law and her late sister's family (with a notable and unexplained exception).

      Her parents, grandparents, brothers and brothers-in-law all played important roles in the life of Paisley either as landowners, manufacturers, burgesses or as directors of charitable organisations.

      General Background (up to 1900)
      Boys were sent to Kibble for a range of reasons, although the majority were sent for committing offences. During the school's first forty years boys sent here were generally aged between 10 and 15, although the earliest records list a case of an eight-year-old being committed to Kibble.

      Most offences committed by boys sent to Kibble during this period were thefts; however, in many cases these involved theft of food, clothing, blankets and, most commonly, theft of shoes. The latter offence is tinged with irony since shoemaking was the most common trade taught to boys while they were in the school and many boys were apprenticed to local shoemakers on their release. Some more serious offences are recorded but these were in the minority. Boys are regularly listed as being orphans, abandoned by parents, or being the children of drunkards. Therefore, in the absence of a State welfare system and given the nature of the thefts, it appears that at least some of these boys stole from necessity rather than greed or malice. There are also some cases of boys being referred to Kibble for ?care and protection? and not because of any wrongdoing on their part.

      It was standard practice for boys to be sentenced to adult male prison (usually for fourteen days, occasionally for twenty-one days) before being moved to Kibble. This was in order to give them a short, sharp shock and hopefully deter them from following a life of crime. Reformatory sentences were usually for between three and five years. The practice of passing down preliminary prison sentences prior to admission to reformatory was abolished in Scotland in 1893, following the Day Industrial Schools (Scotland) Act, which also severed links between the adult prison system and reformatories.

      While in the school, boys were given industrial training; this was mainly of a practical nature but did include lectures from external personnel on subjects such as dairying, the silk worm and tannery processes. In addition to shoemaking, tailoring and farming were the main skills taught. Although the emphasis was on equipping the boys for employment on their discharge, they were also taught to read, write and do arithmetic; many of them are recorded as unable to read or write on admission to the school, while some could read but not write.

      Social evenings were also held; these included entertainments put on for parents and invited guests/dignitaries by the boys, where the boys would perform musical recitals, for example. Boys were also treated to magic lantern shows as a form of entertainment.

      Sleeping accommodation was in large dormitories and the daily routine, taken from an 1881 Trustees' Report, was as shown below:

      Daily Timetable (1881)


      5.30 - 6am Rise; wash; dress

      6 - 9am School; worship

      9 - 10am Breakfast; play

      10am - 1pm Work

      1 - 2 pm Dinner; play

      2 - 6pm Work

      6 - 7pm Wash; supper; play

      7 - 8.30pm School; worship

      8.30 - 9pm Prepare for bed

      9pm Bed

      This illustrates the mixture of work, education, social interaction and religious worship that constituted Kibble's ethos and routine.
    • Not Superintendent of Kibble Reformatory on 22nd October 1881 according to article in The Scotsman (now a Mr John Grant)
    • Text of Letter from John Rae (Superintendent of Kibble)
      To The Scotsman, April 1878

      Sir, - The comparison made at the annual meeting connected with the Wellington Reformatory between that institution and the "other six or eight in Scotland", as reported in The Scotsman of the 11th inst., is calculated to produce an unfavourable impression regarding this school, and I believe the others also, which is warranted by neither facts nor figures. I refer to the statement "that the percentage of the boys from the Wellington Reformatory School who turned out well was 91 per cent, and this was equalled by only one other similar institution in Scotland - that of Old Mill, Aberdeen. Of the other six or eight the percentage was a slow as 68 or 74 per cent."
      The institution with which I have long been connected is one of the "six or eight" referred to. The above statement does it an injustice, to rectify which allow me only to make two quotations from the twentieth report of the inspector of reformatory and industrial schools, which is the latest published. (The letter then includes a statistical table of figures for Wellington, Old Mill and Kibble) If, business fashion, we deduct the bad from the good, the net percentage of doing well will be ? Wellington, 83; Old Mill, 82; and Kibble, 84. Again, at page 298 of the same report, the number of reconvictions during a year over the total discharges since the opening of each school is - Wellington, 4 per cent; Old Mill, 4.4 per cent; and Kibble, 1.9 per cent.
    Person ID I2246  Pearce
    Last Modified 3 May 2014 

    Father RAE, Andrew,   b. 28 Dec 1797, Abbeygreen, Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 May 1871  (Age 73 years) 
    Mother RAE (nee MOORE), Mary /Muir,   b. Abt 1801, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 12 Sep 1825  Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • At marriage Andrew was residing at Knocken and Mary at Kerse
    Family ID F383  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family RAE (nee UNKNOWN), Mary,   b. c1836, Greenock, Renfrewshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. RAE, Andrew,   b. c1858, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. RAE, John,   b. 1861, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. RAE, Robert,   b. c1860, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. RAE, Elizabeth,   b. c1865, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 24 Aug 2008 
    Family ID F724  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 27 Oct 1831 - Knocken, Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - as a visitor - 1851 - 203 Thistle Street, The Gorbals, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1861 - 95 Belgrove Street, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1871 - Kibble Reformatory Institution, Greenock Road, Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1891 - 6 Ibrox Place, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - 1901 - Ironmonger Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1901 - 7 Kirkwood Street, Govan, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Documents
    John Rae census 1861
    John Rae census 1861
    Robert Rae census 1901
    Robert Rae census 1901
    Robert Rae census 1891
    Robert Rae census 1891
    Elizabeth Rae Census 1871
    Elizabeth Rae Census 1871
    John Rae Letter To The Scotsman re Kibble Reformatory
    John Rae Letter To The Scotsman re Kibble Reformatory

  • Sources 
    1. [S63493] 1871 Scotland Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2007) (Reliability: 3).


  

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